3 artists that will be at SP-Arte that you need to know

With the arrival of the second edition of the year of Sp-Arte, we separated three female artists with incredible works for you to discover

Série Paisagens Perdidas, 2014, Ana Maria Tavares
Series Lost Landscapes, 2014, Ana Maria Tavares

In 2022, SP-Arte will have a second edition. Before the pandemic, August was traditionally the month of Sp-photo, which as the name implies was aimed at photography. Since 2020, with the comings and goings of face-to-face, blended and online, the second event of the year has been transforming itself. Last year, SP-Arte took place in the second half of the year at ARCA, an industrial warehouse located in the Vila Leopoldina neighborhood. It seems that fashion has caught on since this year, after first edition of the event having happened normally in the first semester, the second edition, a kind of SP-expanded photo, takes place again at ARCA. 

The event, named SP-Arte: Brazilian Routes, receives the public from the 24th to the 28th of August and has 70 exhibitors from different corners of the country. According to the organizers of the event, the intention is to “strengthen ties between agents from the five regions of the country, valuing photographic and artistic production throughout the national territory”. Among the artists participating in the fair, we find strong names of women with solid careers. We selected among these many names, three artists that you need to know, check it out below!

Ana Maria Tavares, from Galleria Continua

Ana Maria Tavares began her production in the midst of the vogue for painting, in the early 1980s. Her canvases seek to interact with the surrounding space: the artist arranges her panels in an attempt to create environments.

In 1984, he moved to the United States, where he studied for a master's degree at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago. At the Chicago school, she is encouraged to develop more spontaneous work and to make use of references and industry standards. According to art critic Tadeu Chiarelli, based on her North American experience, which spans from 1984 to 1986, the artist radicalizes her dissatisfaction with “the limited spaces of traditional modalities”. Some installations from that period are on display at the Superior Street Gallery in Chicago. From 1988 onwards, the artist sought to attribute an even more industrial appearance to her works. Some sculptures resemble design objects, such as furniture, stairs, whips and others.

In the 1990s, it makes important installations. Some of his environmental works recreate anodyne, passing places, such as airport lounges, turnstiles and waiting rooms. The artist remakes environments that do not demonstrate distinctive qualities in which people stay for a short time. In these works, the space is invaded by impersonal objects that are foreign to the art gallery.

Ana Prata by Millan

Elefante, 2019, Ana Prata
Elephant, 2019, Ana Silver.

Graduated in Visual Arts from the University of São Paulo, Ana Prata was one of the nominees for the PIPA Prize in 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020. Using different techniques and scales in painting, Ana Prata develops her research in a path of dynamic experimentation . His works, loaded with events between the different layers of paint, result in images with a vibrant, solar and restless effect. In her themes, Prata's practice combines the use of historical references – such as the use of a modernist repertoire – with a latent ambiguity, resulting from the frankness of her painting, which can transit between humor, interiority and critical spirit.

Amelia Toledo by Nara Roesler

Campos de Cor, Amélia Toledo.
Fields of Color, Amelia Toledo.

Amelia Toledo began her art studies in the late 1930s, when she attended Anita Malfatti's Ateliê. In the following decade, he studied with Yoshiya Takaoka and Waldemar da Costa. In 1948 he works with project design in the office of the architect Vilanova Artigas. This contact with key figures in Brazilian modern art, as well as his experience in his father's pathological anatomy laboratory, enabled the development of a multifaceted work that makes use of different languages such as sculpture, painting and engraving. This production also flourishes in contact with other artists of her generation, such as Mira Schendel, Tomie Ohtake, Hélio Oiticica and Lygia Pape. Campos de Cor, Amélia Toledo. Amelia Toledo began her art studies in the late 1930s, when attended Anita Malfatti's Atelier. In the following decade, he studied with Yoshiya Takaoka and Waldemar da Costa. In 1948 he works with project design in the office of the architect Vilanova Artigas. This contact with key figures in Brazilian modern art, as well as his experience in his father's pathological anatomy laboratory, enabled the development of a multifaceted work that makes use of different languages such as sculpture, painting and engraving. This production also flourishes in contact with other artists of his generation, such as Mira Schendel, Tomie Ohtake, Hélio Oiticica and Lygia Pape.

The diversity of Amelia Toledo's means reveals a spirit focused on an expanded investigation of artistic possibilities. From the 1970s onwards, the artist's production went beyond constructive grammar, which made use of regular geometric elements and curves, and began to focus on forms in nature. Toledo begins to collect materials such as shells and stones, and the landscape becomes a fundamental theme of his practice. The artist's painting, on the other hand, has monochromatic inclinations, revealing her interest in research with color.

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